Archive for the ‘Read book online’ Category

REASON 3 DEFYING AUTHORITY

September 1, 2015

The generation gap of the late 20th century was in itself nothing new.  But the explosion of youth culture in the 1960s, with its  questioning of all traditional authorities, has resulted in an older generation deeply pitying of the subservience of its pre-war forbears.  READ REASON 3

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Reason 1 Letting it all hang out

December 7, 2012

The first chapter of 20  Reasons You Won’t Grow Old Like This: How ageing is changing in the 21st century  –

For most people born after 1950, spilling out emotions and fears is normal. The post-war elevation of self-exposure to a primal need and right is one reason why today’s new old have abandoned the traditional stiff upper lip, secrecy and refusal to disclose or introspect of past older generations …

READ REASON 1

The longevity revolution of the past half-century

February 23, 2010

How the age-shift developed in Britain 1951-2008.

View pie charts showing the UK population by age group, using data from the Census reports of 1951, 2001 and 2008.

The advanced nations where growing old is changing

February 23, 2010

See the group-order of rich-world life expectancy at the age of 60 (both sexes) due to high distribution of  GDP per capita.

20 REASONS YOU WON’T GROW OLD LIKE THlS: HOW AGEING IS CHANGING IN THE 21ST CENTURY by Margaret Gullan-Whur

February 5, 2010

20 Reasons – a report on how the generation that defied society in the 1960s is shattering stale images of ageing.  An eye-opener for people in their forties who are already sensitive to ageism and gloomy about the idea of working on to  seventy.   A stimulating read for age-defying 50-60-pluses who still see being old as their own aged parents’ thing, not their own.  A wake-up call for policymakers, health-care professionals and manufacturers who plan on treating the old of the future as more of the same, with the same old attitudes and needs.

Start reading online  …  the jacket note, Chapter Content list, what people who read the first draft had to say, and the INTRODUCTION